Help Us Save South Africa

 

a country in Crisis

If we are going to help South Africa, we have to acknowledge there is a serious problem. 

How did we get to this point?

what is such a crisis?

What should be Done?

What is such a Crisis?

Escalating Violence

South Africa is one of the most violent and dangerous places in the world.

deteriorating infrastructure

Words like emergency, crisis, and grid collapse are not an overreach.

Failing Economy

Investors are dumping SA bonds soon to be considered “junk”.

targeting of minorities

Prominent political leaders chant “Kill the Boer, Kill the Farmer”.

HOW DID WE GET TO THIS POINT?

Circa 1500 A.D.

The earliest people living in South Africa were the Khoi and San. The first Blacks moved across the Limpopo river into modern-day South Africa at around the 1500-1600s. The first Europeans to set foot in South Africa were Portuguese sailors in 1488.

1652 A.D.

The written history of South Africa began in 1652 when the Dutch landed on April 6 at what is Cape Town today. The Dutch settlement expanded to the east until the settlers met with the westerly-expanding Xhosa people. This resulted in a series of wars between the Dutch and Xhosa.

The British Empire

In the early 1800’s, Great Britain seized the Cape Colony from the Dutch and continued the wars against the Xhosa. Many of the Dutch colonists wouldn’t accept British rule and moved to the north to where Johannesburg is today. British ambitions led them to war with the Zulu, eventually defeating them in 1879.

The British Defeat the Boer

The British then went to war with the Dutch in the north over mineral resources, defeating them eventually as well. Boer women and children were placed in concentration camps by the British. The defeat of the Boers led to the formation of the Union of South Africa in 1910 as a self-governing state of the British Empire.

Apartheid: Identifying, classifying and separating by race.

Under rule by the British Empire, the self-governing state was largely “segregationist”. However, as other parts of the world “de-segregated”, British-ruled South Africa entered into “apartheid” in 1948. Meaning “separateness”, apartheid codified the segregation of races into law. The Population Registration Act of 1950 provided the basic framework for apartheid by classifying all South Africans by race, including Bantu (black Africans), Coloured (mixed race) and white. A fourth category, Asian (meaning Indian and Pakistani) was later added.

Apartheid in the Independent South African Republic

In 1961 the Union of South Africa gained independence from Britain and became the Republic of South Africa. Under this new republic, apartheid continued, and that meant blacks were not able to vote, choose where to live, choose how to educate themselves, nor obtain the same level of basic services available to whites.

An armed struggle against Apartheid

Apartheid caused tremendous conflict in South Africa. Groups such as the African National Congress (ANC) and the South African Communist Party (SACP) engaged in an armed and violent struggle against apartheid. One member of SACP who had served as the President of the ANC led a campaign of sabotage against the South African government. Arrested and imprisoned in 1962, and subsequently sentenced to life imprisonment for conspiring to overthrow the state, Nelson Mandela served 27 years in prison.

F.W. de Klerk Dismantles Apartheid

A white president by the name of F.W. de Klerk came to power and began to overturn the rules and laws that had created and perpetuated apartheid. Under that president’s administration, ANC leader Nelson Mandela was released from prison and then worked closely with the President to draw up a new constitution for South Africa.

Collaborating on a New Constitution

An all-white referendum showed that the whites were in favour of abolishing apartheid, and an agreement was reached on the new constitution in 1993. Nelson Mandela and F.W. de Klerk would share the Nobel Peace Prize that year for their efforts.

Sharing the Nobel Peace Price

An all-white referendum showed that the whites were in favour of abolishing apartheid, and an agreement was reached on the new constitution in 1993. Nelson Mandela and F.W. de Klerk would share the Nobel Peace Prize that year for their efforts. This new constitution led to the country’s first multi-racial elections in 1994. The African National Congress (ANC) won the election overwhelmingly and Nelson Mandela became South Africa’s first Black president with de Klerk as his first deputy.

Peace and Reconciliation

Nelson Mandela called for forgiveness and reconciliation by all sides, and a future of peace and prosperity seemed to await South Africa. However, Nelson Mandela determined not to seek reelection in favor of his desire to promote charitable causes full time and in 1999 Thabo Mbeki, one of Mandela’s Deputy Presidents, was elected as President of South Africa.

Corruption

The years from 1999 to present date can best be described as unrestrained government corruption and extreme discrimination and violence towards whites. Government policies and legislation were enacted that marginalized or excluded whites entirely from portions of the economy or government.

A Plan Taking Shape

“In his brutal honesty, Ramaphosa told me of the ANC’s 25-year strategy to deal with the whites: it would be like boiling a frog alive, which is done by raising the temperature very slowly. Being cold-blooded, the frog does not notice the slow temperature increase, but if the temperature is raised suddenly, the frog will jump out of the water. He meant that the black majority would pass laws transferring wealth, land, and economic power from white to black slowly and incrementally, until the whites lost all they had gained in South Africa, but without taking too much from them at any given time to cause them to rebel or fight.”

Dr Oriani-Ambrosini, speaking of now President of South Africa, Cyril Ramaphosa (pictured)

The Lure of Communism

Government corruption, excessive taxation, and runaway entitlement programs strain the economy and further open the door to the familiar seduction of communism. Living lives of luxury themselves and evading prosecution for corruption at every turn, political leaders redirect the frustration of the black community towards the white community. Racial rhetoric tied to communist tenets of redistribution of wealth radicalize a generation.

Scapegoating

 As government corruption and negligent management of infrastructure has taken an increasingly heavy toll on the economy and quality of life of the populace, minorities have become convenient scapegoat for the political leaders enriching themselves from the people.

A New Racism

Despite a redistribution of hundreds of millions of dollars to apartheid victims, along with a redistribution of land to blacks, much of the redistributed land remains fallow to this day. More tragic is the reality that the forgiveness and reconciliation espoused by Nelson Mandela became replaced by racism and hatred towards whites. The new reality is that the forgiveness and reconciliation espoused by Nelson Mandela has been replaced by racism and hatred towards whites, encouraged by political leaders.

What Should be Done?

All races and all peoples of South Africa desiring peace should unite to create public awareness of the genocide and conditions in South Africa, as well as to develop community restoration programs.

Alert the World

Those who profit from our suffering mislead the world with false narratives. We must report the unbiased truth.  The South African government does not speak for South Africans.

Provide assistance to all races

Humanitarian relief, education, and employment should be available to all, regardless of race.   All South Africans deserve equal treatment.

Unite to defeat government corruption

The government enriches itself from the sweat of its people. Only the politically connected benefit.  They sow and cultivate the racial conflict. 

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